Digital Futures of Special Collections – Workshop

charter3.jpg

Building on the work of the Creating Heritage Artefacts for Research and Teaching in an e-Repository (CHARTER) project, the university of Exeter Special Collections are holding a free, one day workshop examining the futures of special colections.

Digital Futures of Special Collections

Workshop Day

16th March 2010

A workshop day aimed at curators and collection managers looking at the practical and strategic issues of heritage collections and digitisation.

An opportunity to share good practice, problems and solutions and to build partnerships within the research library community.

The focus will be on the strategic and practical but not technical.

Included in the programme:

10:30am                      Arrival/Registration

11am – 11:50am         Welcome; Academic Perspectives: creating digital collections online – a Dspace case b  study. (John  Plunkett, Department of English; Jessica Gardner, Assistant Director, Library and Research Support)

11:50am – 1pm           What are we all doing and Why?

Collaborative group work

1pm – 2pm                  Lunch

2pm – 2:45pm            Ensuring e-Content doesn’t mean Ephemeral Content: Learning the lessons from the  JISC digitisation programme (Ben Showers, JISC Programme Manager)

3pm – 3:45pm             Panel discussion with Susan Worrall (University of Birmingham), Dorothy Johnston (University of Nottingham), Inderbir Bhullar (Women’s Library)

Christine Faunch (University of Exeter)

3:45pm – 4pm             Workshop round-up

4pm – 5pm                  Reception (all welcome) launching Exeter’s Digital Collections online and Research Commons


charter1.jpgThere is no charge to attend this workshop day; participants should be ready to discuss relevant issues that are most important to their organisation and the sector.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

 Booking Details:

To book a place please email: libspc@exeter.ac.uk or phone 01392 263879/262097

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Places still available for free digitisation and digital preservation workshops

Places are still available for two free seminars organised by JISC Digital Media on key topics relating to digitisation projects.

1) Successfully Building and Managing Digital Media Collection (5 places remaining)

Date: 15th September

In order for a digitisation project to provide useful, effective content many interlinking aspects need to be considered. This seminar, which draws on the knowledge of experts in the field, considers some of the vital facets which lie quite apart from the actual act of digitising. Topics range from setting up small projects to looking at case studies of large, successful mass digitisation projects, recording accurate and relevant metadata, rights issues and balancing the demands of users and stake holders.

2) The Digital Media Collection +100 Years (20 places remaining)

Date: 16th September

Obsolescence, deterioration of physical storage media or withdrawal of institutional support: just what will prove to be the greatest threat to the materials we digitise today? This seminar projects one hundred years into the future and attempts to predict the future ‘preservability’ of what we digitise today. This seminar will examine changing user demands and inevitable developments in technology.

Location:

Both seminars will be held at the University of Bristol at 3-5 Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1TB

Further details of the day, can now be seen on the JISC Digital Media Web site

Places are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Please send your request to attend to training@jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk

The seminars are funded by the JISC under the ‘JISC ITT Workshops & Seminars: Achievements & Challenges in Digitisation & e-content’ strand.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Digital Curation and Preservation Outreach and Capacity Building Event

14-15 September 2009
Holiday Inn, Belfast, Northern Ireland
http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/capacity-building-belfast-2009

The Joint Systems Information Committee (JISC) and the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) in co-operation with the Strategic Content Alliance (SCA), the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) and the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) are delighted to announce that we will deliver a joint two-day workshop in Belfast to help to establish more effective digital curation and preservation networks of support across the UK and between domains of public sector activity.

In particular, this workshop will explore:

“the current capacity of small and medium-sized organisations (including universities) to effectively undertake long-term preservation of digital materials

“how the mixture of organisations and support agencies in the area of digital preservation and curation can best work together, and how they relate to international initiatives

“recent and emerging technical developments in the curation and preservation field

The workshop will provide a mixture of presentations, breakout sessions and practical exercises and aims to:

“inform the ongoing refinement of the content and objectives of training and professional development courses for the widest possible audience.

“establish requirements for curation and preservation support, advice, and guidance for various domains from both a local and UK wide perspective.

To this end, the workshop will provide half-day taster courses for both Digital Curation 101 (DC 101) and Digital Preservation Training Programme (DPTP) courses.

Benefits of participation will include:
Participation in this workshop will provide registrants with an opportunity to establish peer support networks to share their concerns, experiences, and approaches both with colleagues from Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK for digital curation and preservation activity within their institutions. The workshop will also enable participants to help inform the development of future training and professional development courses to ensure that they are fit for purpose.

Following this event, a short report will be drafted offering:

“Recommendations for improved local and UK-wide communications and interactions between a range of support networks and public sector institutions;

“A summary of local and UK-wide training and professional development requirements as gathered from the workshop participants.

“A set of recommendations from a local and UK-wide perspective to inform the future development of digital curation and preservation training courses.

The venue:

The workshop will be held at the Holiday Inn, Belfast. If required, accommodation will be provided on-site for participants for the nights of September 13th and 14th 2009.

Holiday Inn
22 Ormeau Avenue
Belfast
BT2 8HS

For directions to the venue, please see the website.

Registration:
Registration is open to participants from the university; schools; library; cultural heritage; local government; health; public broadcasting sectors. Preference will be given to participants from Northern Ireland but will also be open to eligible registrants from the rest of the UK and from the Republic of Ireland. Registration is free and participation is limited to 40 participants.

To register for this event, please complete the online form.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Making the Case for Digitisation

The philosopher, linguist and novelist Umberto Eco described libraries as a form of repository, or bank, which served to secure the written word and the treasures of the text.

The essential nature of the library, even today, is therefore one of contradiction: where the traditional processes of cataloguing and classification act to hide and ‘lose’ books as much as they reveal and allow access to books.

A Precious Manuscript

Such a view seems appropriate in the week that the British Library seems to have ‘mislaid’ 9,000 books.

A recent article  in the Guardian highlighted that visitors to the British Library discovered

Renaissance treatises on theology and alchemy, a medieval text on astronomy, first editions of 19th- and 20th-century novels, and a luxury edition of Mein Kampf produced in 1939 to celebrate Hitler’s 50th birthday

were all apparently missing.

And I suspect that this is a situation that almost all libraries, special collections and archives can sympathise with.

What is interesting about this case is that the digitisation of such precious texts represents an opportunity to not only preserve these texts and the knowledge  they contain, but also to open up access for everyone who might be interested in these works. 

While there are often financial, infrastructural and ideological barriers to digitising such material, it is hard to imagine a better illustration of why digitisation is such an important part of an institutions practices.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Web 2.0, IPR and digital preservation: new JISC resources

Two new resources have been recently launched by JISC as guidance on how to deal with IPR issues in Web2.0 content and on digital preservation, including preservation of user generated content.

The free Web2Rights online diagnostic tool addresses the confusion often found when dealing with IPR in its relation to Web 2.0 within education, and provides a step-by-step user guide to ensure the protection of both their and others’ copyright in using, deploying and repurposing content.

The six minute animation below explains some of the main concepts based on three different user scenarios.

Web2IPR

The new handbook created by JISC’s PoWR project (Preservation of Web Resources) offers a wealth of tips and information for web managers, data professionals and those making decisions concerning the long-term preservation of online resources.

PoWR handbook

With such vast quantities of digital data available on or via the Internet, the PoWR handbook encourages institutions to see the requirement for coherent preservation strategies. Key issues include prioritising what to keep, how to keep it, which preservation policies to implement, the consequences of preservation decisions and how to provide sustainable access for the future.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Study of preservation plans of digitisation projects

JISC recently commissioned a tender to undertake a study of the preservation plans and processes of the sixteen projects funded under Phase 2 of the JISC Digitisation Programme and identify best practice and issues in terms of medium or long-term access to the digitised content.

The tenders have now been received and the winning proposal came from the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), an international membership body working on various issues related to digital preservation.

The leaders of the study (Frances Boyle and Kevin Ashley) will be commencing work soon, and, as well as studying the plans will be developing some case studies based on work of specific projects.

Outcomes from the study will be available in April 2009.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Large-scale preservation – not just science

The programme for the 4th International Digital Curation Conference, Radical Sharing: Transforming Science? has just been announced, and very interesting it is too.

But in the rush to explore the issues related to the preservation of terabytes of astronomical or physical data, it’s worth remembering that it not just the sciences that are the preserve of large-scale data and preservation issues.

Wired graphics on database sizes

This recent graphic from Wired states that while the Hubble Space Telescope has collected 120 terabytes of data, the ancestry.com geneaolgy database is over four times bigger, coming in at 600TB

Large-scale preservation needs to be across the board, not just on the sciences.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS