Digitisation project is ‘Underexposed’

Following recent discoveries in the John Rylands Library Special Collections, UNDEREXSPOSED is an exhibition in Collaboration with The Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI), celebrating the life of one of Manchester’s early photographic pioneers, J.T. Chapman.

Chemist, inventor and photographer, Chapman invented some of the processes that were to become standard in early photography.

However, he is widely omitted from history books as he published his formula under the pseudonym ‘Ostendo non Ostento’ (I show, not boast).

Working from Deansgate, Manchester, Chapman also invented and sold his own cameras and projectors.

The exhibition also showcases a selection of glass plate negatives, recently discovered and linked to the Langford Brooke family of Mere Hall in Cheshire, which have been cleaned, re-housed and digitised by CHICC.

CHICC is The Centre for Heritage Imaging and Collection Care, a JISC funded project to develop a Centre for Heritage Digitisation, based within the University of Manchester.

The John Rylands Library will be holding a series of events associated with the exhibition, for more information please contact 0161 306 0555 or email jrul.events@manchester.ac.uk

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Birds of Paradise

The following is an image taken from the Centre for Heritage Imaging and Collection Care project at John Rylands Library, University of Manchester.

The images is one of many beautiful hand painted plates of birds, created between 1891 -98.  The image is a result of the project working with the Folio Society to create a facsimile of Sharps Birds of Paradise from the Rylands collection.

More can be discovered on the project’s blog.


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Cross-searching eContent in Higher Education

The Visualising China Project is hosting a one-day workshop in Bristol on Tuesday 21st September, with presentations and discussion on the topic of cross-searching distributed, interrelated, online resources.

Presentations will include:

The workshop will tackle topics such as harvesting protocols (including OAI-related solutions), presentation layer problems/solutions such as for ranking search results, and scalability/sustainability issues in cross-searching.

The workshop is also interested in receiving more recommendations for speakers and topics for discussion.

If you have suggestions and/or wish to attend please contact Nikki Rogers as soon as possible: nikki.rogers@bristol.ac.uk.

Date: Tuesday 21st September 2010

Venue: ILRT, Bristol

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Centre for Digital Excellence Captures Chaucer on Camera!

 new-image.jpgThe Codex (Centre for Digital Excellence) project at the University of Manchester recently visited National Trust Petworth House in Sussex to digitise a medieval Chaucer manuscript.

The project aims to establish partnerships with museums, libraries and archive repositories throughout the region, and beyond, to develop and test collaborative models for digitisation.

This was the projects first visit to a collection to photograph and digitise a collection, and also gave the team at Petworth House a chance to ask the team questions and watch them work.

The event was captured by the BBC and includes an interesting piece of film with the curator at Petworth House.

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Scholars and digital resources – an unconference

One of the findings from the measuring impact study was the importance of not relying on quantitative statistics. Seductive as they are, the array of numbers from a Google Analytics report do not tell the whole story.

Considered feedback, review and criticism direct from the intended users are just, as if not more, important.

However getting such qualitative commentary can be difficult. Focus groups and the like take time and effort to set up.

This is why it us encouraging to see an entire conference being organised on the relationship of a digital resource to the schoilarly work it is encouraging.

The London Lives ‘unconference’ is inviting contributions from anyone whose research will benefit from use of the London Lives website- an enhanced resource that will will provide access to primary sources containing 240,000 pages of manuscripts sources, and 3.2 million names, reflecting the history of eighteenth-century London.

The event takes place in July 2010 and further details are available on the conference website. The London Lives resource itself will be available in March 2010

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